Compose a 1500 words essay on The Dark Comedy Slaughterhouse-Five. Needs to be plagiarism free!Download file to see previous pages… He eventually passes out, but someone rescues him. This act is som

Compose a 1500 words essay on The Dark Comedy Slaughterhouse-Five. Needs to be plagiarism free!

Download file to see previous pages…

He eventually passes out, but someone rescues him. This act is something that he “resented” (44). He finds death beautiful, but someone else steals his decision from him, forcing him back into a life of pain and ugliness. In trying to commit suicide, Billy is attempting to exert his free will. But, he is not allowed. The black humor comes from the irony that Billy wishes to die but cannot, even when he is in a place, World War II, where death surrounds him. During his boot camp, the Army trains Billy as a chaplain. Obviously, this position is not one for a man who wishes to die as a chaplain is not often on the front lines and does not often participate in combat. Eventually, Billy finds himself on the front lines and once again tries to die. He does not attempt to avoid bullets. Instead, he “[stands] there politely, giving the marksman another chance” (Vonnegut 33). His fellow soldier, Roland Weary, pulls him to safety against Billy’s will. Weary even acknowledges that he will deny Billy his free will. He states, “’He don’t want to live, but he’s gonna live anyway” (48). After eventually being captured by the Germans, Billy seems to be the closest to obtaining his wish as the Nazis ship him to a concentration camp, but again, he survives by no action of his own. Eventually, he is placed in Dresden to work at a malt syrup factory. During his time there, the Allied forces carpet bomb and then incinerate the city, but Billy survives by mere chance by being in an airtight underground slaughterhouse. The humor is that Billy wishes to die so badly, but no one will let him. Meanwhile, others around him are dying from unlikely events that are absurd in their rarity. Billy’s wife dies of carbon…

Instead, Vonnegut presents small images that make the reader laugh and then realize that the laughter is a result of the horrors taking place. One of these small images is the coat that Billy Pilgrim receives upon arriving at the camp. While all the captured soldiers around him receive military coats, the guards give Billy the “coat from a dead civilian” (Vonnegut 82). All of the coats come from dead prisoners, so the tragedy apparent in Billy’s coat is that it came from a civilian, who likely had no part in the war and was innocent. By deduction, the reader can assume that the coat came from a Jew whom the Germans killed. In addition, the coat “had a fur collar and a lining of crimson silk, and had apparently been made for an impresario about as big as an organ-grinder’s monkey. It was full of bullet holes” (90). The image of Billy Pilgrim in a small coat makes the reader and the concentration camp guards laugh. However, the coat probably came from a child that the Nazis executed. While laughing, the reader remembers all the murders that the Nazis committed, murders of men, women, and children.

The execution of Edgar Derby is Vonnegut’s greatest statement on the evil of man. As the writer himself states, “’I think the climax of the book will be the execution of poor old Edgar Derby” (Vonnegut 4-5). In a book where the firebombing of Dresden occurs and thousands of people, the death of one man would seem insignificant.

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