Compose a 2750 words essay on Monastic Buddhism in South East Asia. Needs to be plagiarism free!Download file to see previous pages… Within a modern context, Buddhism may be divided into two separat

Compose a 2750 words essay on Monastic Buddhism in South East Asia. Needs to be plagiarism free!

Download file to see previous pages…

Within a modern context, Buddhism may be divided into two separate schools which are known as Theravada, also known as ‘Southern’, Buddhism and Mahayana, which is called ‘Northern’, Buddhism. Theravada is the main tradition within Sri Lanka and it is thought that this country has had the most ancient incessant history of Buddhism. (Kapstein, 1087) Mahayana, on the other hand, is the leading Buddhist tradition found in Tibet and, although the geneses of this tradition are debatable, it is a diverse and varying tradition from that of the Theravada. (Jones, 121) The Theravada and Mahayana Buddhist conventions share ordinary viewpoints such as the Four Noble Truths, the Eightfold Path and Dependent Origination. Other similarities include similar principles such as Anicca, Dukkha, Annata, Sila, Samadhi, and Panna. In addition to this, the two traditions also share a rejection of the notion of a supreme creator. However, Theravada and Mahayana differ on some important aspects such as the final goal of practice and their perspective on the notion of Buddha-nature as well as other doctrinal differences. There are neither rites of passage nor a special ceremony in becoming Buddhist. There is a long process of disciplinary training and education given to those seeking to become a monk (Bhikkhu). Anyone seeking to become a Bhikkhu is known as a novice. …

ly and no other monks has any objection to the given answers, this person is acknowledged into the Sangha, the monk community, and in this way, their training commences. Southeast Asian Countries and Monastic Education According to historical findings, Thaton was an operational port of call on the course between India and other prominent countries of southeastern Asia. From religious perspective, missionaries happened to come regularly from the eminent mission training centers of Conjeeveram and Amaravati and proceeded on from there to Cambodia, Thailand, and Java. At that time, though, these missionaries were Theravada Buddhists and the region around Thaton remained Theravada, it should be kept in mind that side by side with the stretch of Theravada, there was also a tough Mahayana movement from China, Malaya, Cambodia, and northern India. When King Anawrahta controlled to the throne in Pagan in northern Myanmar, he was not happy with the religious practice of his people, which was a weird combination of Tantrism, Mahayana, and Hinduism. So, when he held meeting the Arahat Shin Arahan and came to know about the simple yet reflective teaching of the Theravada, he was instantly converted and requested the Arahat to stay at Pagan for the establishment of the Dhamma. At Arahan’s suggestion, King Anawrahta asked the king of Thaton for some relics and copies of the Tipitaka, and when he was refused, he attacked and occupied Thaton and brought to Pagan all the relics and copies of the Tipitaka as well as a large number of monks to sermonize the Dhamma.

Leave a Reply