Evaluate the case study above using the behaviourist approach. Provide the strategies for prevention using this theory only.

Evaluate the case study above using the behaviourist approach. Provide the strategies for prevention using this theory only.. Case Study 2

Emma is in Year 5 and is nine years old. She attends a mainstream primary school.

Since starting year 5 her teacher has noted that Emma has become increasingly disruptive in class by calling out, swearing, and refusing to work with pupils who are not in her friendship group. She becomes argumentative and confrontational when the teacher or learning support assistant tries to intervene to sort out the problem and get her back on task. She is often sent to see the headteacher where she seems happy to sit and chat with the school secretary. Emma is working slightly below her age appropriate National Curriculum levels. Emma says she hates school but likes play and lunchtimes. She states that lessons are ‘boring’ except for PE and drawing cartoon faces. She often refuses to take her book bag or homework tasks home. There are no reported incidences of bad behaviour at playtime or lunchtime.

Home life seems settled but on speaking to Emma’s mother the teacher gained the impression that things were strained since Emma’s grandma had moved in. Emma’s mother was very defensive of her daughter and was irritated by the school constantly ‘moaning’ about Emma’s behaviour.

Part one essay

Evaluate the case study above using the behaviourist approach. Provide the strategies for prevention using this theory only.

Part two:

Using the same case study above, choose a DIFFERENT theory related to behaviour and provide strategies for intervention based on tis theory.  Analyse the strength and limitations of using the behaviourist theory and the new theory chosen for the second assignment.

Evaluate the case study above using the behaviourist approach. Provide the strategies for prevention using this theory only.

Posted in Uncategorized

Leave a Reply