Hello, I am looking for someone to write an essay on Confidentiality in Marital and Family counseling/psychotherapy. It needs to be at least 1250 words.Download file to see previous pages… . Confide

Hello, I am looking for someone to write an essay on Confidentiality in Marital and Family counseling/psychotherapy. It needs to be at least 1250 words.

Download file to see previous pages…

. Confidentiality in Marital and Family Counseling/Psychotherapy Confidentiality is often prescribed in many articles on marital and family counseling and psychotherapy, research, and with how professional counselors and psychotherapists should deal with couples and families. What does some of the current literature say about confidentiality? Butler et al. (2009, p. 125) pointed out that one challenge facing marital and family therapists is whether to facilitate partner disclosure or accommodate nondisclosure after a disclosure of marital infidelity by one of the couple to the therapist. According to Butler et al., many therapists accommodated the infidelity secret because doing so is both “efficient” and “compassionate” in view of the possible repercussions of a revelation on the couple’s relationship (p. 125). In assessing the appropriateness of the accommodation, Butler et al. considered the ethical, pragmatic, consequential, and implications of the accommodation and concluded that facilitating voluntary disclosure of infidelity is the most ethical response to the revelation done confidentially (2009, p. 125). The 2009 study of Butler et al. cited Brock &amp. Courfal (1994) who reported that a large majority or 94% of marriage therapists had kept secret a confidentially disclosed infidelity. According to Butler et al. (2009, p. 127), the non-disclosure of infidelity can be defended based on the principle of nonmaleficence or the principle of doing no harm. On whether harm was done to the other party in a relationship in a non-disclosure, Butler et al. (2009, p. 127) pointed out that many marriage and family therapists defend non-disclosure as non-maleficent because the marriage or couple relationship benefits the couple. However, Butler et al. (2007, p. 127) contradicted this view because “accommodating a secret has a strong potential to harm the relationship and the potential for benefits is doubtful.” In other words, the Butler et al. argument is that non-disclosure has a doubtful beneficence in addition to being a maleficent. Butler et al. (2009, p. 127) also argued that justice and equality ethics imply that each in a partnership or relationship should be fairly treated by both the partner and the therapist. For Butler et al. (2009, p. 127), “providing false information, withholding essential information, or otherwise obscuring the true conditions of the association, or even failing to provide information in a timely manner may represent exploitation, as it defrauds the other partner of his or her essential right of informed relationship choice” or that he or she is drawn in a relationship based on wrong, incorrect, or false information. Butler et al. asserted that a partner’s right to correct information on a relationship exists from the time of relationship formation (2009, p. 127). Further, Butler al. (2009, p. 127) argued that “without the provision of all relationship-relevant information, essential individual rights in relationship are denied.” Butler et al. (2009, p. 130) continued that false information or even inability to provide information in a timely manner deprive the other party of his or her rights and, therefore, unethical. Moreover, Butler et al. (2009, p.

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