Hi, I need help with essay on Human Sexuality. Paper must be at least 1750 words. Please, no plagiarized work!Download file to see previous pages… This also becomes highly pertinent for the simple f

Hi, I need help with essay on Human Sexuality. Paper must be at least 1750 words. Please, no plagiarized work!

Download file to see previous pages…

This also becomes highly pertinent for the simple fact that non-monogamy, especially in the forms of divorce and other forms of separation, adultery and marital infidelity, has already been a part and parcel of the daily social existence (Emmens 2003). Hence this leads us to the subtle differentiations between various conceptual categories that are critical in the constitution of our sexual desires and preferences. The constructionist approach towards human sexuality and sexual preferences have already shattered the essentialists’ and conservatives’ arguments on the ground that sexual subjectivity, including identity and sexual orientations and desires, are inherently offshoots of the larger social and cultural environment (Ritchie and Barker 2006, 585). It is in this context that a postmodern challenge against the hegemony of heterosexual monogamy has emerged from an albeit new form of “partner arrangements that vary as to the number of people involved, the sexes of those involved, the sexualities of those involved, the level of commitment of those involved, and the kinds of relationships pursued” known as polyamory (Strassberg 2003, 440). A form of non-monogamy polyamory stresses upon “people’s capacity to share and multiply their love in honest and consensual ways” (Anderlini-D’Onofrio, 2004 as quoted in Ritchie and Barker 2006) as opposed to the rigid ethical, moral restraints associated with monogamy. The emergence of polyamory as a conceptual category seeking to subvert the prevalent beliefs regarding sexual desire and practice has significantly contributed to the ongoing debate around, especially, polygamy and other non-monogamous unions. …

The emergence of polyamory as a conceptual category seeking to subvert the prevalent beliefs regarding sexual desire and practice has significantly contributed to the ongoing debate around, especially, polygamy and other non-monogamous unions. In fact defining the various forms of non-monogamous and other forms of sexual practices, as neatly articulated in the Lawrence case at the Supreme Court (See Emens 2003 and Ashbee 2007 for a detailed analysis of this case), like bigamy, polygamy, incest, obscenity, masturbation and so on as logical extensions of enterprises to legalize same-sex marriage invites us to revisit those categories, including monogamy and the postmodern polyamory. Despite the different factors that co-exist with monogamy and that have already invalidated the very base of monogamy, the institution of monogamy still looms large “in this nation’s social landscape” (Emens 2003, 8). In the western culture it still continues to be a fact that that life-long or serial monogamy with one (everlasting) partner is the dominant model of relationships available. It exerts its hegemony through various apparatuses that are basically concerned with mainstream, statist ideologies. Depictions and valorizations of monogamous couples, fidelities and other romantic associations still fill the media discussions and other forms of cultural representations. This compulsory notion of monogamy not only renders all other forms of non-monogamy invalid and invisible but also labels alternative desires and relationships as completely unethical, amoral and pathological (Ritchie and Barker 2006).

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