Hi, need to submit a 1000 words essay on the topic Compare/Contrast on: Ceremony by Leslie Mormon Silko and Grizzly Years by Doug Peacock.Download file to see previous pages… The most striking aspec

Hi, need to submit a 1000 words essay on the topic Compare/Contrast on: Ceremony by Leslie Mormon Silko and Grizzly Years by Doug Peacock.

Download file to see previous pages…

The most striking aspect of both novels though lies in the fact that like many protagonists in great American fiction, the characters reach transcendence. Ceremony details the experience a young Native American man, Tayo, has after serving in the marines in the Philippines in World War II. Tayo signs up because his cousin, Rocky, does He does not want to kill anybody, and he consciously avoids it during his tour of duty, so his guilt is not the same as Peacock’s. Instead, Tayo is plagued by guilt over the death of Rocky, in the Philippines as a result of war. “He did not know how to tell [Ku’oosh] that he had not killed any enemy or that he did not think that he had. But he had done things far worse, and the effects were everywhere, in the cloudless sky, in the dry brown hills, shrinking skin and hide taut over sharp bone” (Silko 33). Tayo and Rocky had been raised more like brothers than cousins, but because Tayo is half white, Auntie, Rocky’s mother, favors Rocky and shows distain for Tayo, her substance abusing sister’s child. …

Tayo must overcome his mother’s sins, his mixed race, his two-faced friends, and the damage to his soul from serving in World War II. One of the antagonists in Peacock’s story is war, just as it is in Silko’s. At the beginning of Ceremony, Tayo has flashbacks to his war experience much like Peacock does in Grizzly Years. Grizzly Years tells of Peacock’s years of studying grizzly bears in Yellowstone National Park and other areas where grizzlies live. At times, the narrative veers off to some other location like the desert in the southwestern United States, near where Tayo’s story is set, and Viet Nam when Peacock has flashbacks from his time serving there. Peacock flashes back quite frequently at the beginning of the book, but at about the halfway point the flashbacks taper off and become more recollections than actual stories of events that occurred while Peacock was in Viet Nam. As the story progresses his stories become that of repeated encounters with grizzly bears, sleeping out in the rugged terrain, tracking grizzlies and photo shooting them, bad weather, hunger, and always the danger of being mauled by one of the great animals he loves so much. Like Tayo, he overcomes his battle fatigue and malarial symptoms in part because of his quests into the wilderness to dwell among the grizzlies. Peacock is distrustful of the government, who kills bears when they maul humans. sometimes the bears are provoked. sometimes they are not. Peacock frequently sabotages conservationists’ and others’ attempts to protect humans who invade the grizzly territory in his efforts to help the grizzlies live without human interference. Peacock also feels guilt after serving in Viet Nam.

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