I will pay for the following essay Based on your analyses of The Catcher in the Rye and two films demonstrate one lesson developed in these texts about the role of. The essay is to be 5 pages with thr

I will pay for the following essay Based on your analyses of The Catcher in the Rye and two films demonstrate one lesson developed in these texts about the role of. The essay is to be 5 pages with three to five sources, with in-text citations and a reference page.

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The characters of Holden Caulfield in J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye, the many characters in John Hughes’ The Breakfast Club, and Kat and Bianca Startford in Gil Junger’s 10 Things I Hate About You all struggle to maintain relationships with their parents while discovering their own identities, yielding different results in each situation. From the beginning of The Catcher in the Rye, it is evident that Holden Caulfield’s relationship with his parents isn’t quite what it is supposed to be. Holden discusses how he has been kicked out of school and yet, his parents are entirely unaware of it. He also expresses that he has no desire to come home. Right there, it was evident that Caulfield had a disconnect from his parents. Part of this disconnect may have been related to the fact that Caulfield was sent away to boarding school for so much of his life. Not only did he go to boarding schools, but he went to multiple boarding schools due to failing out of one after the other. It is clear that he is a deeply emotionally disturbed individual throughout the novel, and yet his parents are insignificant figures in his life, as seen in the novel. Mr. and Mrs. Caulfield were not entirely to blame for this, of course. The family had gone through a great deal of emotional turmoil outside of Holden’s personal circumstances. Outside of the novel’s action, Holden’s older brother Allie, who serves as the family’s “golden child”, passed away from leukemia. Of course, this had an effect on Holden, his parents, and the relationship between them. As parents who are in mourning, their other children may not be on the forefront of their minds, as unfortunate as it may be. The consumption of their attention by the death of their child does not mean that they love their other children any less. Rather, they are preoccupied by the situation at hand. Consequently, the remaining children may feel as though they have been forgotten or are unimportant. In Holden’s case, he feels as though he’s living in the shadow of his deceased brother. Studies show that “Most children are resilient when bereaved, and their adaptation is facilitated by positive and authoritative parenting,” (Dowdney). Unfortunately for Holden, his bereavement process has not been facilitated. Rather, he has been in boarding school, where he has no choice but to sort things out for themselves. Coupling this with general teenage angst, it is extremely difficult for Holden to establish his own place in the world, let alone establish a healthy relationship with his parents. Each character in John Hughes’ The Breakfast Club has an intricate relationship with their respective parents. Their difference in social status also further the complexity of these relationships, as well as their behavior as a result of these relationships. In this film, the parent-child relationship is explored in a way in which we see how it effects the individual’s search for them true selves. In John Bender’s case, he adopts his tough guy persona as a way to mask the feelings he has over being physically abused by his father. Studies have shown that “Adolescents are at risk of academic failure, school drop-out, delinquency, and substance abuse.

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