I will pay for the following essay Consolidation versus Reheasal in Working: Acconting for Improved Memory after Timed Delays. The essay is to be 10 pages with three to five sources, with in-text cita

I will pay for the following essay Consolidation versus Reheasal in Working: Acconting for Improved Memory after Timed Delays. The essay is to be 10 pages with three to five sources, with in-text citations and a reference page.

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The data provides some direct evidence for the consolidation theory, but none for the rehearsal theory. The implications and limitations are discussed, with an emphasis on more detailed research to follow on these results. Consolidation versus Rehearsal in Working Memory: Accounting for Improved Memory after Timed Delays Introduction Psychologists have always been fascinated with understanding the way our brains process and store information, and the mechanisms by which we retrieve this information from the different memory stores. Traditional distinctions between memory stores suggest the presence of sensory memory stores, a short term store and a long term store. While sensory memory is supposed to retain some information for only a few seconds at most, and the short term memory (STM) retains a few units of information for about half a minute or so. the long term memory store has the capacity to retain a vast amount of information for a very long period of time (Robinson-Riegler &amp. Robinson-Riegler, 2008). The short term storage – which has been prominently studied – may also be understood through Baddeley and Hitch’s (1974) multi-component model called the Working Memory. They describe this system as having specialized components that deal with different kinds of information and as being responsible for storing and processing information simultaneously (Baddeley &amp. Hitch, 1974). A number of theorists have tried to explain the process by which information is committed to the different memory stores and the problems that people encounter in the process of doing so. The process by which people commit information to STM has been studied in great detail. particularly since this process has valuable applications to everyday life (Robinson-Riegler &amp. Robinson-Riegler, 2008). One theory proposes that information is committed to STM through rehearsal of material (Craik &amp. Watkins, 1973). According to the rehearsal effect, people quickly rehearse information phonologically when they get a chance during attention demanding tasks in a bid to maintain the information (Camos, Mora &amp. Oberauer, 2010). A typical example of this process is when a person who wants to copy an address will repeat it to themselves a few times while they write it down. Evidence for the phonetic nature of information associated with rehearsal comes from studied like the one conducted by Camos, Mora and Oberauer (2010) which show that rehearsal can be inhibited in the presence of phonetically similar items. This study also found that phonologically similar items affected memory when other processing tasks were involved, indicating that rehearsal required cognitive resources. Barroillet, Bernardin, and Camos (2004) suggest that time related decay occurs from STM because other tasks that demand attention and cognitive resources that are required for information maintenance. The study findings demonstrate that when an individual had fewer tasks in the interval between units of information, they were able to commit more information to memory as compared to those who completed more tasks. Typical rehearsal studies use articulatory suppression (AS) tasks that inhibit the verbal rehearsal of information. AS tasks use repetitive, irrelevant speech units to prevent rehearsing of pertinent information (Baddeley, Lewis, &amp. Vallar, 1984).

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