I will pay for the following essay Post Colonial Reading of Lucius Seneca’s Text Apocolocytosis. The essay is to be 4 pages with three to five sources, with in-text citations and a reference page.Down

I will pay for the following essay Post Colonial Reading of Lucius Seneca’s Text Apocolocytosis. The essay is to be 4 pages with three to five sources, with in-text citations and a reference page.

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However, this has not been a success. The world is full of pain, and this is directly linked to the actions of humankind. Inasmuch as people would want an ideal world full of peace and concern for every member of the society, the actions of man has demonstrated the reverse. The selfish needs and the concern of always wanting to achieve everything at the expense of others have seen many people make others suffer. The pain they go through make others rejoice. It is not ethical and even the perpetrators of such actions that causes pain know that their deeds are not not fair. This paper seeks to critically analyze pain and how it affects mankind with respect to Seneca’s text Apocolocytosis. Life is akin to a dwell for the living. This saying has been used for such a long time and by so many philosophers that it has become a cliche. Life is precious and one should be allowed to enjoy the maximum out of it. In many instances, man would always attempt to find solutions to various problems that affect him negatively. In some instances, the solution to such problems would result in pain to others. It would be ethical to ensure that when looking for happiness, one does not cause sufferings to others. In some instances, some pains are caused by gods with some supernormal power. In (Lucius par 3), Mercury tries to reason with fate about the condition of Claudius. He asks fate, “Cruel beldame, why do you let the poor wretch be tormented?” (Lucius par 3). This statement may make one feel that Mercury is concerned about the condition of Claudius, and that he is a very caring person. However, his further statement demonstrates that he is far from being concerned about the fate of Claudius. He says, “Do what has to be done: Kill him, and let a better man rule in empty court.” (Lucius par 3).This clearly demonstrates that when he petitioned fate to consider bringing Claudius to his grave, it was not out of the kind hearted nature that shared the pain of the king. However, it was out of self-interest to see to it that he dies so that someone else, probably him, would take over the reins of the nation. His discussion with the god also reveals the fact that some of the sufferings and pains that man undergoes are always caused by gods. It demonstrates that the gods would also keep grudges, and in such instances, they may cause great sufferings to man. He asks, “What grudge is this you bear against him and the whole empire?” (Lucius par 3). It is a demonstration that at times the pain that men sometimes go through is as a result of the actions of these gods. They dictate what happens on earth and would inflict whichever pain they deem is necessary and for whichever duration they may feel is fit for a person. This is demonstrated in the statement, ‘I will cause to die within one year and at no great distance apart, and I will not dismiss him unattended.’ Fate plays a major role in determining pain of an individual. Fate of a person cannot be controlled by that person. One can neither determine his fate, nor avert anything that fate has for one. At times it is painful to accept fate as it is because it might be putting more than would be expected pressures on an individual. For instance, we see Phoebus imploring fate to act in favorable manner as to avert pain that might arise out of various life conditions. Phoebus says, “Oh sister Fate! I pray take none away, but suffer this one life to be longer than mortal day.

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