Instructions In addition to the thread, you are required to reply to 2 other classmates’ threads. Each reply must be at least 200 words, and assertions must be supported by 1 textbook and/or biblic

Instructions

 In addition to the thread, you are required to reply to 2 other classmates’ threads. Each reply must be at least 200 words, and assertions must be supported by 1 textbook and/or biblical citation and 1 outside academic resource.  

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Systematic cultural value analysis helps us to grasp the alternative paths that other cultures may prefer the alternative paths that other cultures may prefer in their ways of thinking, valuing and being.[1] Cultural value patterns serve many functions, including the identity meaning function, motivational function, and ingroup-out-group evaluation function.[2]Cultural beliefs and values provide the anchoring points to which we attach meanings and significance to our complex identities.[3] Tingey-Toomey and Chung call these in groups and out groups. When we interact with our own culture we operate in knowledge that outsiders may not have. There are things that may be understood without being said. As we learn to communicate cross-culturally, insight into those cultures values can be useful to developing a successful relationship with them and ultimately to accomplishing whatever goal that needs to be accomplished. Intercultural misunderstandings may pile up if we do not attach the appropriate cultural values to explain the words and nonverbal gestures that people use in a particular cultural scene.[4] Cultural values form the implicit standards by which we judge appropriate and inappropriate behaviors in a communication episode.[5]

Livermore makes the point that, “The ability to understand and work with a culture doesn’t just come intuitively. It requires a disciplined effort to better understand cultural differences.”[6] The path toward improving CQ Knowledge begins with seeing the influence of our culture on everything we think, say, and do. Culture is defined as the beliefs, values, behaviors, customs, and attitudes that distinguish one group from another.[7] What we believe and value influences behavior and what is and is not acceptable in varying cultures. The limitation to this is that as an out-group one would not possess the knowledge necessary to communicate successfully in order to achieve an goal, like sharing the gospel for example. Having in-group knowledge, an understanding of what is appropriate and what is not appropriate, is helpful in to understanding what is important to a culture and how to best and most effectively share necessary information, such as the gospel, in a way that would be accepted. If one was not mindful of these cultural patterns, one would run the risk of possibly offending the other culture which would ruin an attempt to communicate to achieve the ultimate goal.

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