Need an argumentative essay on Character analysis. Needs to be 3 pages. Please no plagiarism.Instead of accepting this offer, Smith chooses to face the consequences of failure, and deliberately passes

Need an argumentative essay on Character analysis. Needs to be 3 pages. Please no plagiarism.

Instead of accepting this offer, Smith chooses to face the consequences of failure, and deliberately passes up his chance of winning the race. He serves the reminder of his time at the Borstal in hard labor and returns to his life of crime after his release. “The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Runner” ends on a note of ambiguity as to the ultimate well-being of Smith. Smith’s decision not to submit to the rules of the establishment lets him assert his independence and personal integrity, but his ultimate happiness is uncertain as he cannot be completely free of society. Smith affirms his independence and personal integrity by refusing to win the race. He is aware of the significance of the ‘Borstal Blue Ribbon Cup for Long-Distance Running,’ and of the prestige his winning of the cup will confer on the institution. He enjoys his sport and admits that “It’s a treat, being a long distance runner” (Sillitoe 10). However, he makes a deliberate choice to lose the race. This is Smith’s way of showing that he will live life on his own terms, and his refusal to conform to the expectation of the establishment. The fact that the Governor sees him as “his prize race-horse” rankles Smith, and bolsters his determination to “lose that race because I’m not a race-horse at all” (Sillitoe 12). …

It is important to Smith that he retains control over the direction of his life: “You should think about nobody and go your own way, not on a course marked out for you” by others (Sillitoe 39). Smith confounds the Governor’s hope of winning the cup. This is his triumph over society. At the same time, the pleurisy he contacts as a result of his running enables him to evade being drafted into the army. This is second triumph, as he equates the Borstal with the army and its “high walls” (Sillitoe 11). In this context, it is undeniable that Smith has “won my own race twice over” (Sillitoe 48). Smith also asserts his personal honesty by losing the race. Smith emphatically conveys the message that he lives by a code of ethics which is completely divergent from that laid down by society. He realizes that normal societal expectations are “something that can’t be true about me, being born and brought up the way I was” (Sillitoe 14). He is determined to be true to himself. Society, as represented by the Borstal Governor, urges him to “win the race and be honest” (Sillitoe 40). In Smith’s reckoning, “winning means running right into their white-gloved wall-barred hands” (Sillitoe 40). By losing the race, Smith is honest to his own principles and his repudiation of the establishment’s rules. Losing the race is also Smith’s form of vengeance against society. He loses the race because “I only want a bit of my own back” (Sillitoe 40). Smith triumphs over the establishment by refusing to submit to its demands. However, Smith’s triumph is not an indication of his ultimate happiness and freedom. Smith is an outsider, who has no stake in the interests of the law-abiding majority of society.

Leave a Reply