The narrator describes the stamp of Abner’s stiff foot as he enters de Spain’s house as a clockwork finality, a sound out of all proportion to

The narrator describes the stamp of Abner’s stiff foot as he enters de Spain’s house as a “clockwork finality, a sound out of all proportion to the displacement of the body it bore and which was not dwarfed either by the white door before it, as though it had attained to a sort of vicious and ravening minimum not to be dwarfed by anything” (804). Assume that the narrator provides this description of Abner’s limp through Sarty perspective, then describe the effect on Sarty of Abner’s war injury. What does Abner think it allows him to assume, to take to demand for himself? How must his son reconcile his own judgments of his father’s actions with his belief in his father’s courage and sacrifice in the past?

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